Cortisol

Test ID: 

702902

CPT code:

82533

Synonyms:

Compound F

Hydrocortisone

Clinical Use:

Establish the diagnosis of adrenocortical insufficiency, Addison’s disease, adrenocortical hypersecretion, Cushing’s syndrome. Malfunction of the organs in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal cortex axis will result in alteration of the cortisol levels.

Test Information:

Cortisol (hydrocortisone) is the most prominent glucocorticosteroid, and it is essential for the maintenance of several body functions. Like other glucocorticosteroids, cortisol is synthesized from the common precursor cholesterol in the zona fasciculata of the cortex of the adrenal gland. For the transport of cortisol in blood, about 90% of cortisol is bound to corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG) and to albumin. Only a small amount of cortisol circulates unbound in blood and is free to interact with its receptors.
The most important physiological effects of cortisol are the increase of blood glucose levels (enhancement of gluconeogenesis, catabolic action) and its anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive action.
Synthesis and secretion of cortisol by the adrenal gland are controlled by a negative feedback mechanism within the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal cortex-axis. If the cortisol level is low, corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) is secreted by the hypothalamus, which causes the pituitary to release adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH). This stimulates the synthesis and secretion of cortisol by the adrenal gland. Cortisol itself acts in a negative feedback mechanism on the pituitary gland and the hypothalamus. In addition, stress is followed by increased cortisol secretion.
Serum cortisol concentrations normally show a diurnal variation. Maximum concentrations are usually reached early in the morning and then concentrations decline throughout the day to an evening level that is about half of the morning concentration; therefore, for interpretation of results, it is important to know the collection time of the serum sample.
The cortisol status of a patient is used to diagnose the function or malfunction of the adrenal gland, the pituitary, and the hypothalamus. Thereby, cortisol serum concentrations are used for monitoring several diseases with an overproduction (eg, Cushing syndrome) or underproduction (eg, Addison disease) of cortisol and for monitoring several therapeutic approaches (eg, dexamethasone suppression therapy in Cushing syndrome and hormone replacement therapy in Addison disease).

Specimen Type:

Serum

Requested Volume: 

0.8 mL

Minimum Volume: 

0.3 mL

Container Type: 

Red-top tube or gel-barrier tube

Collection:

If a red-top tube is used, transfer separated serum to a plastic transport tube. Blood should be drawn at 8 AM and 4 PM to evaluate baseline diurnal variation (see Cortisol, AM & PM [104000]). Morning specimen is often ordered with ACTH level.

Storage Instructions:

Room temperature.

Stability Requirements:

Temperature

Period

Room temperature

14 days

Refrigerated

14 days

Frozen

14 days

Freeze/thaw cycles

Stable x3

Rejection Criteria

Citrate plasma specimen; improper labeling

Return Back to Test Directory

MCI Diagnostic

Providing top patient care with fast results. 

7018 South Utica Avenue

Tulsa, Oklahoma 74136

Hours of Operation

Mon - Sat: 7 AM-11 PM

Sun: 7 AM-3 PM

COVID-19 Drive-Thru Hours

Mon-Fri: 9 AM-6 PM

Sat: 9 AM-3 PM

More Information - Click Here

Government Contract

DUNS # 125722608

Cage Code: 3FPQ3

COVID-19

COVID-19 Fee & Pricing